Tank troubles…

For the past few months I’ve been having problems with my water. I seemed to run out frequently, and the hamlet started charging me for call-out fees. Not cool.

…for those of you unfamiliar with the north, the first thing to note is that, though there is running water, it’s stored in a tank under your house. Beside it, you generally find the same sized tank filled with sewage…as one decreases, the other increases, and trucks travel the roads to pump and suck. Yuck.

How is it possible to run out of water so quickly? It’s true that the tank is small, but it’s not like I’m a chronic cleaner with the shower and washing machine constantly in use. Finally, I just refused to pay the account until someone came to the place to check out the problem.

As it turns out, the ‘float’ reader wasn’t set right and my taps would stop running when there was still half a tank left! No more weekly $150 call-out fee and, since Clint has started passing out pop to the drivers, we never run dry…

Now, to the main point of this post. When I was under the house, laying on the tank, and peering into the small access hole, I couldn’t help but notice the sediment piled up on the bottom…and that’s literally my drinking water! When I asked around, I learned that the inside of the tank is actually supposed to be cleaned once a year. I have no idea when my unit was cleaned last, but it’s certainly been more than 365 days.

…so I set off on the adventure of trying to get the tank cleaned. In fact, the Co-op in town employs someone to do this – a small someone. She has to actually get in the tank through that tiny hole to scrub it clean after the water has been emptied. Nasty! We drained as much as we could by running the taps and washing every bit of clothing in the apartment, but still more had to be scooped out.

Brace yourself for this…the following picture is not a pot of coffee dumped in the snow. It’s where the bucketfuls of water taken from the tank were dumped. My drinking water.

My drinking water...

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